Last edited: October 3, 2019

Abbotsford, BC | (604)607-3516 | joellefroese@hotmail.com 

  • joellefroese

For People Who Want to "Just Ride"

Updated: Dec 26, 2018

Your motivation for riding plays a big role is how you develop as a rider, what horse you want to ride and how you train it. Do you know what your motivation is?



Why You Do What You Do

Every so often a client will tell me, "I don't want to do ___________. When I get on, I want to just ride." This statement always amuses me, because people have so many different ideas of what "riding" is. In the same day one person may inform me that they get very bored doing the very thing someone else claims is "real riding".


Strange as these statements are, they are also very useful to me as a coach/trainer. A rider that really wants to go out on the trails needs a brave, calm horse without a lot of set up and I will need to desensitize him a lot. I will also have pick my exercises and tips carefully, to get the most "bang for my buck" so that my rider doesn't get bored and give up and is still prepared to deal with anything that might come their way on the trail. Other riders are very happy in a ring, riding only when it is quiet and the weather is calm. Some like lunging, some groundwork, some not much of either. Goal oriented or competitive riders want to learn and try new things. More social riders want to train at a more leisurely pace. What do you like? Does your coach know it? Does he/she train in that style?


Here is the real kicker; often discovering your motivation is a journey. People typically come to me and say they want to do such and such; however, they may not really know what is involved in training a young horse, preparing for a competition, or what it really is like out there on the trails. Sometimes it is a lot harder than they thought. Or actually kind of boring. Or expensive. Or time consuming. This is especially true of kids but people of all ages are continually developing and changing. What was a great day for you 1 year ago or 10 years ago may not be ideal today. Galloping around a field on a thoroughbred could have seemed fun when you were 14 years old. Maybe at 50 not so much. Be open to these changes, challenge your assumptions. And most of all, have fun.